Temple

1998
Mosaic tile
800 x 305 x 305 cm
Edition of 3

In his response to the artifice of cultivated landscape, Jones sought to make a sculpture which used artifice to distort scale and distance and to manipulate our perception of space. Jones’s interest derived from eighteenth–century landscape architects, who did this when introducing decorative buildings and follies into their schemes. From a distance, the door to Temple suggests that a person may enter the inner space in comfort, but it is in fact just over 1.5m tall meaning an average adult would have to stoop to get inside. This visual trick makes the sculpture appear larger than it is. The four–square outer form gives way to the inner space which is circular, with a conical ceiling that opens to the sky. The figure stands above, on a corner of the roof, so that from inside the pavilion it may be viewed from below. The figure itself is more robust than Jones’s aesthetic normally allows. To describe form with colour, Jones asked the mosaicist to lay out ranges of tessera from yellow to red and from green to blue. They discovered that within the cooler portion of the spectrum the range was much larger than in the hotter hues. Jones has also used colour to introduce the notion of movement in the figure, with the alternate arms of yellow and green in diagonally opposing positions.

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About The Artist

Allen Jones contemporaries at the Royal College of Art included Derek Boshier, David Hockney, R. B. Kitaj and Peter Phillips, who all radically changed the face of British art with their precocious, unconventional and irreverent work, based on popular culture, embracing new subject matter and new materials. Jones’s preference was for glamour and style; his aesthetic centred on beautiful women visualised erotically and stereotypically as in glossy magazines, advertisements and cartoon strips. Underpinned with a great mastery of colour and a consummate painting technique, Jones’s work fluctuates between painting and sculpture. On a flat canvas, painted forms appear sculptural and his three–dimensional works are painterly. He uses colour to describe form, at times with graphic precision, or conversely with an energy and freedom of gesture which is close to direct expression. Similar developments are evident in his printmaking.

Allen Jones' work responds to the artifice of cultivated landscape and seeks to make sculptures which used that artifice to distort scale and distance and to manipulate our perception of space. Jones’s interest derives from eighteenth– century landscape architects, who implemented this by introducing decorative buildings and follies into their schemes.

Allen Jones

Born: 1937

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Allen Jones