Shelter

1998
Galvanised steel
300 x 220 x 220 cm
Edition of 1

The line as indicator of volume, direction, and expression is integral to Victoria Rance's sculpture. The galvanised rods which describe the volume of Shelter resemble a ribcage are spaced regularly in a circle with a gap in their circumference forming an entrance. The rods are gathered together at the top and tied like an inverted bunch of reeds, giving the effect of a tepee without its skin.The scale of Shelter is human, a person may step inside and sit within. In a sense the sculpture is complete only when people are present. When observing Shelter from a little distance, either facing the entrance or diametrically opposite it, the rods appear to be more closely aligned towards the outer edges of the cone-like form. This makes the sculpture appear to be shaded, as though a darker tone has been introduced to emphasise its roundness - a trick of the eye which gives an added dimension to a simple but engaging structure. Victoria Rance has used the same materials and similar mathematical devices - the circle and regular divisions - as with Ark (1997) which was shown at the Cass Sculpture Foundation in 1998. Her aims are still to produce simple pieces with a human dimension which offer the possibility for protection, such as Henry Moore achieved with his sculptures on the theme of Mother and Child, and indeed his series of drawings of people sheltering in the London Underground during the Second World War.

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About The Artist

Upon leaving university, Victoria Rance spent a year sculpting in Mexico, first in Tepoztlan and then in Erongaricuaro. The experience of working within another culture was enriching in many ways. She found that not only were the churches in a predominantly Catholic country full of elaborate carvings which she enjoyed, but there were other layers within the culture to be explored - Aztec and Mayan Art in particular. Rance also discovered that there was a particular harmony between the people and her art, and being allowed such close participation has left a lasting impression. Upon her return to Britain, Rance worked at studios in Rottingdean before moving to London and then to Greenwich, near to Apt Studios in Deptford, where she works today.

In her sculpture Victoria Rance has always been a fabricator rather than a modeller or carver, although she has on occasion worked with clay and with plaster. Her works evolve slowly, but her current practice has returned to ideas pursued as a student; particularly using the human figure as the centre or inhabitant of the work, with the sculpture conceived as a protective skin. Rance is greatly inspired by Naum Gabo and Constructivism and, whilst not emulating their work, her acknowledgement may be seen in the subtleties of making, in tone and in form. It is the spirituality in her work which leads Rance to look back to historical examples for inspiration - not to works of art, but to objects found in museums and in churches.

Victoria Rance

Born: 1959

Other Artworks by Victoria Rance at CASS

1997

Ark

Victoria Rance took as her initial inspiration for Ark the form of a medieval chest used to hold vestments and other tre…

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    Ark
    Victoria Rance took as her initial inspiration for Ark the form of a medieval chest used to hold ves…

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Sculpture

Ark

Victoria Rance took as her initial inspiration for Ark the form of a medieval chest used to hold vestments and other treasures she encountered in a ch…