1995
Portland stone, Slate, Bronze, Steel
310 x 760 x 280 cm
Edition of 1

Pacheco’s Requiem presents the viewer with a sealed parcel or bag, and asks the audience to look elsewhere in the sculpture for clues about its contents. The pile of slate on which the parcel is placed might suggest concealed people, hiding out of fear, or out of malice. The main figure appears to be taking a first tentative step away from the ties that attached him to the earth, his eyes fixed to a far horizon. This figure has fear in his eyes—horror being an acknowledged part of Pacheco’s practice, a horror stemming in part from her memories of the troubles in Brazil in the nineteen sixties, and the military junta to which she was witness. Like much of Pacheco’s other work in sculpture, painting, drawing and printmaking, there is a narrative involved in Requiem. Characters, who inhabit her carefully woven tales are frequently depicted making a journey and the paraphernalia of travel, a mysterious bag or a box of tricks, is a device used in order to intrigue and tease the viewer. Pacheco began work on the sculpture in 1986, as a tribute to her father who had recently died.

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About The Artist

Travel is a recurrent theme in Ana Maria Pacheco's work, together with mysterious narratives, melodramatic encounters, sexuality, death, power, magic and secrets. Pacheco uses concealment to provoke curiosity and narrative around her work. She uses this device to make audiences look elsewhere in the sculpture for clues; thereby holding an audiences attention and encouraging prolonged exploration. All of Pacheco's work, which encompasses sculpture, painting, drawing and printmaking, fabricates a narrative. Her characters inhabit carefully woven tales that are often depicted making a journey with representation of travel paraphernalia, such as a mysterious bag or a box of tricks, which Pacheco uses as a device in order to intrigue and tease the viewer.

Ana Maria Pacheco

Born: 1943